Interesting

Mojito

Cuba is the birthplace of the Mojito, although the exact origin of this classic cocktail is the subject of debate.

One story traces the Mojito to a similar 16th century drink, the "El Draque", in honor of Sir Francis Drake. It was made initially with tafia/aguardiente, a primitive predecessor of rum, but rum was used as soon as it became widely available to the British (ca. 1650). Mint, lime and sugar were also helpful in hiding the harsh taste of this spirit. While this drink was not called a Mojito at this time, it was still the original combination of these ingredients.

Some historians contend that African slaves who worked in the Cuban sugar cane fields during the 19th century were instrumental in the cocktail's origin. Guarapo, the sugar cane juice often used in Mojitos, was a popular drink amongst the slaves who helped coin the name of the sweet nectar.

The most popular theory connects the appearance of Mojito in Havana, Cuban capital, in a small bar called «La Bodeguita del medio», a stone’s throw away from the cathedral in Calle Emperado. The place founded by a Martinez family in 1942 still accepts visitors in the same colonial style bar in the heart of the city.

There are several theories behind the origin of the name Mojito; one such theory holds that name relates to mojo, a Cuban seasoning made from lime and used to flavour dishes. Another theory is that the name Mojito is simply a derivative of mojadito, Spanish for "a little wet", or simply the diminutive of "mojado" (wet).

The Mojito was a favorite drink of author Ernest Hemingway. Ernest Hemingway made the bar called La Bodeguita del medio famous as he became one of its regulars and he wrote "My mojito in La Bodeguita, My daiquiri in El Floridita“. This expression in English can still be read on the wall of the bar today, in his handwriting.

The mojito is one of the most famous rum-based highballs. There are several versions of the mojito.
Cuban Mojito recipe the original authentic recipe from
  • Havana Cuba 1 teaspoon
  • Powdered sugar
  • Juice from 1 lime (2 ounces)
  • 4 mint leaves
  • 1 sprig of mint
  • Havana Club white Rum (2 ounces)
  • 2 ounces club soda
Place the mint leaves into a long mojito glass (often called a "collins" glass) and squeeze the juice from a cut lime over it. You'll want about two ounces of lime juice, so it may not require all of the juice from a single lime. Add the powdered sugar, then gently smash the mint into the lime juice and sugar with a muddler (a long wooden device pictured below, though you can also use the back of a fork or spoon if one isn't available). Add ice (preferably crushed) then add the rum and stir, and top off with the club soda (you can also stir the club soda in as per your taste). Garnish with a mint sprig.

Source: http://www.tasteofcuba.com/mojito.html;  Wikipedia

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November, 2016

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